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How to Up the Spa Quotient of Your Bathroom

Here's a list of ingredients to turn your bathroom into the ultimate relaxation zone
   Amanda Peters  |  written on: 18-12-2021 10:30am

There is nothing like a spa day, especially after a stressful week at work. However, if you can't get away, why not bring the Zen oasis home. All it takes is a bit of remodelling and splurging on your favourite accessories to make every soak a spa-like experience.

Add warmth and natural materials
A great way of creating the spa experience is by adding wooden accents to your bathroom. The exposed beams in this 19th century timber-framed barn give the space a warm, welcoming vibe, while the copper bathtub and pop coloured chair add a luxe tone to the room.

Bathroom, spa, copper tub, wood, exposed beams, barn, country cottage, pop art chair, Wilderness Reserve, Foxton, Jon Hunt

A bathroom at the Wilderness Reserve by Foxton's founder Jon Hunt

Another way to go is by incorporating stone finishes. A pebble stone floor is a subtle way of adding texture and feels amazing underfoot. But if an overhaul of the flooring is too much, an easier and cheaper option is a pebble bath mat.

Bring in the outdoors
As nature has an instant soothing effect, it is a must for a spa bathroom. Not only do plants add life and cleaner air to the room, but most of them thrive in hot and humid environments, making them easy to maintain in the bathroom. Consider adding a fern or spider plant to the décor to give your space a more dynamic look.

Check out our Jungle Book themed Pinterest board 

Credit: Quertier Real Estate from Pinterest

Say it with lighting
Mood lighting is key when it comes to relaxing. It's tough to unwind under the glare of bright florescent lights, but an easy way out is by installing a dimmer.

Think about adding a cluster of pendant lights or even a chandelier to make a bold design statement.

Credit: Aston Matthews

Soak in the tub
If you have the space, nothing says Zen oasis than a freestanding tub. Located at The Arts Club Mayfair in London, this Art Deco themed bathroom is designed around a cast iron tub that effortlessly draws you into the space.

Freestanding cast iron bathtub from Catchpole & Rye, Credit: The Arts Club

Open up storage
You can't be expected to unwind in a mess. Therefore, it's important to have enough space to neatly stash your fluffy towels, robes and essential spa accessories. Having open storage gives you easy access to them, although it does require the area to be kept tidy.

Tip: For the full spa-at-home experience, roll-up your towels and stack them on an open shelf.

Bathroom at the La Sultana Oualidia in Morocco, Credit: icastelli.net

Stock up on oils, bath bombs and salts
Why not design a separate storage unit for just your spa goodies?

Credit: Anders Hviid

Set up a bath caddy or a side stool
When unwinding it's important to have the essentials at hand – book, drinks and nibbles. A bath caddy or stool that holds your soap, scrubs, food and drink will make the experience even more pleasurable, especially if you have a freestanding tub with no shelves around.

Credit: The Shutter Store

A front row seat to the view
To have the complete spa package, it is important to have an equally beautiful view to truly enjoy your 'me time'.

Credit: Anders Hviid

Also read:
5 Ways to Incorporate Beautiful Botanicals into Your Bathroom
9 Ways to Add an Iridescent Shimmer to Your Bathroom

Tell us:
Do you have any easy tips to 'spa up' your bathroom?



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   Amanda Peters
KBB Ark Web Editor. I've been writing for design magazines for a few years now and like nothing more than ‘exploring’ other people's homes (with their permission, of course).

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